Northwest Horizons

New teachers impressed with Northwest’s people, if not facilities

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New teachers impressed with Northwest’s people, if not facilities

Physics teacher Caroline Hess smiles for the camera. Hess comes to us from Northern High School, where she was the 2017-18 Teacher of the Year.

Physics teacher Caroline Hess smiles for the camera. Hess comes to us from Northern High School, where she was the 2017-18 Teacher of the Year.

Caroline Hess

Physics teacher Caroline Hess smiles for the camera. Hess comes to us from Northern High School, where she was the 2017-18 Teacher of the Year.

Caroline Hess

Caroline Hess

Physics teacher Caroline Hess smiles for the camera. Hess comes to us from Northern High School, where she was the 2017-18 Teacher of the Year.

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Northwest this year welcomed several new science teachers. We talked to two of them to see what their first impressions of the school were and how those impressions have panned out.

Physics teacher Caroline Hess comes to Northwest from Northern High School, where she taught for five years. Here she is filling the vacancy left by the retirement of Rice Strange. Hess has taught at another private high school as well.

Her first impressions of Northwest, she said, involved the physical condition of the school.

“The facilities here are considerably worse,” Hess said. “That’s in terms of the heating and cooling, the buildings, and computer access.”

Hess went on to point out what she thinks is Northwest’s primary weakness.

“The biggest problem (here) is how spread out everybody is on campus,” she said. “I think that makes it very hard to create a unified teacher and student body. But I don’t know how that could be solved, given that geographically (we have) a very spread-out campus, with the trailers and the two buildings.”

On the other hand, Hess was extremely impressed by the student body here.

“The students are considerably hard-working,” Hess said. “They expect success–they’re incredibly polite, clever, and delightful.”

Chemistry teacher Katie Pidsosny has a similar history as Hess. She comes to us after six years at Southern and three years at High Point Central.

“There was a chemistry opening (at Northwest), and I’d heard that it was a really good school,” Pidsosny said. “I also really wanted a chance to enjoy science–my degree is actually in chemistry, so that’s my passion.”

Pidsosny, like Hess, was extremely pleased with Northwest’s people.

“(Initially) I was extremely impressed with the school,” Pidsosny said. “The kids here were really respectful; the school was run really well. It just seemed like a really nice, peaceful place to work.”

Now that a nearly a full school year has passed, it appears her initial impression was accurate: she was was quick to answer when asked if her opinion has changed at all this year.

“Nope!” Pidsosny said. “I’m still really impressed.”

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New teachers impressed with Northwest’s people, if not facilities