Tanglewood lights up Clemmons

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Tanglewood lights up Clemmons

A car drives through the arches of lights at Tanglewood Park. The Tanglewood Festival of Lights is one of the largest light shows in the southeast.

A car drives through the arches of lights at Tanglewood Park. The Tanglewood Festival of Lights is one of the largest light shows in the southeast.

Contributed by Lilly Hughes

A car drives through the arches of lights at Tanglewood Park. The Tanglewood Festival of Lights is one of the largest light shows in the southeast.

Contributed by Lilly Hughes

Contributed by Lilly Hughes

A car drives through the arches of lights at Tanglewood Park. The Tanglewood Festival of Lights is one of the largest light shows in the southeast.

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Bright colors twinkle and welcome visitors into a festival of holiday spirit. Every twist and turn brings new radiant lights and visuals with a surprise village inside. 250,000 tourists a year come to Clemmons for one of the largest light shows in the southeast.

The Tanglewood Festival of Lights at Tanglewood Park can be explored in the warmth of one’s car. The park will light up the night sky from six to 11 p.m. until Tuesday, Jan 1.

“You go under all the arches that have the lights on them and then there’s a Christmas tree with lights that follow the radio,” Junior Gretta Overmyer said.

The radio station that is paired up with the displays is 99.5.

“You could turn to the radio station, but there was a lot of commercials,” Junior Ava Clapp said.

Overmyer, Clapp and junior Lilly Hughes drove through the winter wonderland last Friday, Nov 30.

The tradition of the lights began in 1992 with a grant from the Z Smith Reynolds Charitable Trust and funds from the Tanglewood Park Foundation. Today, the trail is a little under five miles with over a hundred displays.

“There was a lot of lights so it took us a hot minute to get through it,” Overmyer said.

With so many decorations, the setup begins in August before the event begins in November.

Contributed by Lilly Hughes

Halfway through the display, a gift shop at the red barn appears with Santa Claus. Lowes Foods’ S’moresville is also there so one can roast some marshmallows outside the gift shop.

Clapp enjoyed the hot chocolate at the red barn and the American Flag light display.

“They had this part with a bunch of bells and if you roll down your windows you can hear bells ringing, that was my favorite part,” Overmyer said.

A car, truck or van is $15 each and prices increase along with the size of the vehicle.

If one would rather go in style to the lights; horse-drawn carriage rides are available. Up to four people can ride one for $80. For large groups, a tractor-pulled hayride fits up to 25  people for $150. Both require a reservation.

“This was the first time I’ve gone in a while, but I remember last time we were waiting in line for years,” Overmyer said.

The wait for the view can be lengthy, but the girls ensure that it’s worth it.

“It was definitely worth the trip and the lights are really pretty,” Clapp said.

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