Northwest Horizons

What might become of Northwest’s trailer cats?

Northwest's very own aristocats

Two+of+the+Northwest%27s+cats+are+eating+food+outside+the+bus+trailer.+Rumors+have+been+circulating+that+they+will+soon+be+relocated+despite+living+here+for+more+than+10+years.
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What might become of Northwest’s trailer cats?

Two of the Northwest's cats are eating food outside the bus trailer. Rumors have been circulating that they will soon be relocated despite living here for more than 10 years.

Two of the Northwest's cats are eating food outside the bus trailer. Rumors have been circulating that they will soon be relocated despite living here for more than 10 years.

Mackenzie Milani-Kaufman

Two of the Northwest's cats are eating food outside the bus trailer. Rumors have been circulating that they will soon be relocated despite living here for more than 10 years.

Mackenzie Milani-Kaufman

Mackenzie Milani-Kaufman

Two of the Northwest's cats are eating food outside the bus trailer. Rumors have been circulating that they will soon be relocated despite living here for more than 10 years.

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If you are a student or parent of Northwest, it’s likely that you’ve seen some fluffy animals hanging out at the edge of the mobiles. For more than a decade, these five or more cats have lived just outside of the school, hiding under the trailers. Occasionally they will venture out to hunt down a rat or to eat the cat food that the transportation officer feeds them. They add a charm to the school that can bring a smile to your face.

However, even though the cats have lived on the high school grounds for more than 10 years, have been fixed and have never been known to hurt or attack anyone, there are plans in the works to get rid of them.

“Considering that they can’t reproduce and have never caused harm to anyone,” science teacher Jessica Tidmore said, “maybe they’re getting rid of the trailers finally?”

Tidmore has been teaching biology at Northwest for four years, and she is the leader of the Red Dog Farm club, an organization that helps make sure that all animals they can help are aided by them. The Red Dog Farm is not the only option, though.

Tidmore and English teacher Lora Medley have both been trying to help the cats ever since they found out about their impending removal.

“I remember recently that Mr. Watkins came to me about the cats, because I have a cat rescue myself,” Medley said. “He came up to me and he asked me if I could take the cats or if I knew somebody who could.”

Medley has been teaching at Northwest for eight years, and the cats were there even before then.

“Right now I’m trying to organize to come and safely get the cats and take them to a no-kill shelter,” Tidmore said. “I’m trying to just get them rescued and hopefully relocated.”

Tidmore has also contacted an organization called Juliet’s House in Greensboro to see if they could take in the cats. Juliet’s House take in pets and makes sure that they go to a good home.

Nobody seems to agree of the exact reason why the cats are scheduled for removal, but some people have a few guesses as to what led to this decision.

“It’s possible that a student complained about (the cats),” Tidmore said. “Or the cats might just be unwanted now.”

“(The new transportation lady) is allergic to cats, from what I’ve heard,” Medley said. “I’ve also been told– nothing specific– that there have been other complaints about the cats.”

As the cats have lived at Northwest for as long as most staff can remember, it’s obvious that they’re very old. There would be many risks to taking them away from the high school. A big move for them could be very stressful and dangerous.

Each year, 1.5 million shelter animals get euthanized if they aren’t adopted. Most of the euthanizations occur to cats rather than dogs.

“Because (the cats) are outdoor cats, we would need to have a barn or something like that to make sure that they don’t get too disoriented and try to come back to the school,” Medley said. ‘When you transfer feral cats, it’s recommended that they stay inside for 30 days to rehabilitate themselves to their new environment. The same applies to the semi-feral cats we have here at the school.”

Juliet’s House: https://www.julietshouse.org/

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1 Comment

One Response to “What might become of Northwest’s trailer cats?”

  1. Michelle R Goodson on November 26th, 2018 11:34 am

    hello….I would be interested in the large yellow Tabby

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What might become of Northwest’s trailer cats?