Northwest Horizons

County moves grading period after inclement weather

A+calendar+from+before+Hurricane+Michael+shows+Nov.+1+and+Jan.+18+as+teacher+workdays.+Many+students+are+frustrated+with+the+loss+of+Oct.+11+and+Oct.+12+because+of+how+it+affects+their+learning+experience.
A calendar from before Hurricane Michael shows Nov. 1 and Jan. 18 as teacher workdays. Many students are frustrated with the loss of Oct. 11 and Oct. 12 because of how it affects their learning experience.

A calendar from before Hurricane Michael shows Nov. 1 and Jan. 18 as teacher workdays. Many students are frustrated with the loss of Oct. 11 and Oct. 12 because of how it affects their learning experience.

A calendar from before Hurricane Michael shows Nov. 1 and Jan. 18 as teacher workdays. Many students are frustrated with the loss of Oct. 11 and Oct. 12 because of how it affects their learning experience.

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When Florence hit Guilford County as a tropical storm, many students were excited for the extended weekend. Tests were moved and homework was given later due dates. However when Hurricane Michael moved in nine days later, students were less ecstatic.

With the loss of four school days, two being excused by Senate Bill 2, students may find themselves in a flurry of make-up work after the grading period was moved from Oct. 31 to Nov. 1, previously a teacher workday.

“Guilford County Schools will use Nov. 1 and Jan. 18 as the make-up dates for Oct. 11 and Oct. 12, when schools were closed for Hurricane Michael,” principal Ralph Kitley said in an email to staff.

Jan. 18 has also become the end date of the second quarter instead of Jan. 17. This additional time can be used for grading, or can allow teachers to add additional classwork grades. For students on the other hand, the days are less beneficial.

“It’s given me less time,” senior Diva KC said. “I don’t know as much about the subjects we’re learning about, especially as we’re coming toward the end of the quarter and we’re taking tests. We just missed so much; I have a gap.”

Some students have voiced similar frustration about the loss of time. They forgot what they had been learning prior to the breaks, and testing on them without the time for explanation left lapses in understanding.

We just missed so much; I have a gap.”

— Diva KC

“It’s really tough for my AP class because they’re not going to move the AP exam, yet we struggle to finish the syllabus as-is,” Latin teacher Parker Jackson said. “Missing four class periods worth of material puts us significantly behind in where we need to be syllabus-wise.”

In May, students taking AP classes will have to conclude with the corresponding exam. In order to maintain consistency, College Board won’t reschedule exams because of inclement weather. This means that regardless of how many days are lost, students will have to take the exam with whatever information they were taught in the remaining class periods.

“Toward the final exams, there’ll be some stuff we don’t know as much about,” KC said.

If teachers are unable to rework their syllabi and shorten units enough before May, students will either have to fill in the gasp themselves or take the exam knowing they’re missing information. Every year snow days cause us to lose learning hours, but autumn hurricanes are a different story. But in the end, we cannot control weather. Whatever has caused these storms, they cannot be undone and we’ll have to adjust on our own.

“It’s just nature and were going to have to deal with it,” Jackson said. “There’s no way to move our AP exams.”

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County moves grading period after inclement weather