Northwest Horizons

Seasonal affective disorder takes toll on Northwest students

Leaves+change+colors+on+a+tree+at+northwest+school.++As+seasons+change+some+student+experience+seasonal+affective+disorder.
Back to Article
Back to Article

Seasonal affective disorder takes toll on Northwest students

Leaves change colors on a tree at northwest school.  As seasons change some student experience seasonal affective disorder.

Leaves change colors on a tree at northwest school. As seasons change some student experience seasonal affective disorder.

Leaves change colors on a tree at northwest school. As seasons change some student experience seasonal affective disorder.

Leaves change colors on a tree at northwest school. As seasons change some student experience seasonal affective disorder.

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






As school kicks into high gear and summer has all but completely faded from view, many prepare in excitement for the sweater weather. However, there are some people who dread the cooler winter and fall seasons. Nearly 20 percent of all people have some form of seasonal affective disorder.

Seasonal affective disorder (SAD) is a medical condition where people become depressed in relation to the change in seasons of the year. Some of the symptoms include low energy, problems sleeping, difficulty concentrating and having feelings of depression nearly every day. These symptoms would begin to show during late fall and in early winter months.

“Whenever it starts to get cooler out my mood drops,” junior Taylor Strain said. ‘I used to live in Wisconsin where the winters were long and gloomy.”

Many people tend to get a little less energetic and happy around the cooler seasons but don’t truly understand why. A lot of it has to do with the chemicals in the brain such as Serotonin and Melatonin levels which influences sleep patterns and overall mood. The reduced sunlight also effects the circadian rhythm also knows as the biological clock. Over the warmer seasons people experience an abundance of sunlight and are thrown off when some of it is taken away.

However, there are many people who aren’t at all affected by the dramatic change in weather and scenery. In fact, some people prefer the cooler months of the year.

“I really don’t see any reason to be more upset in the fall and winter; there are a lot of holidays to look forward to,” junior Shelby Lester said.

There are ways to help cope with this condition. Some treatment options include light therapy, medication and psychotherapy. If treatment isn’t sought out, seasonal affective disorder generally resolves itself within a month or two or whenever the seasons change and the weather is back to warm and bright.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Leave a Comment

Discuss the story here; your name and email are not required. All comments will be strictly moderated.




Northwest Horizons School News
Seasonal affective disorder takes toll on Northwest students