Northwest Horizons

Northwest’s newest beekeeper buzzes his way through the halls

Alex+Hooijschuur%27s+new+bee+hives.+He%27s+extremely+excited+about+his+new+beekeeping+adventures.
Alex Hooijschuur's new bee hives. He's extremely excited about his new beekeeping adventures.

Alex Hooijschuur's new bee hives. He's extremely excited about his new beekeeping adventures.

Alex Hooijschuur's new bee hives. He's extremely excited about his new beekeeping adventures.

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There’s one student whose passion for bees sets him apart from all the rest. Senior Alex Hooijschuur has a hobby that most students at Northwest would find scary or allergy-inducing. This year he became fascinated with the idea of beekeeping, so he started his own hive and bought $700 worth of supplies to satiate his bees.

“I’m a beekeeper,” Hooijschuur said. “I mostly do that because I believe that bees play an important role in the environment as well as in parts of our economy, like agriculture, and plus, who doesn’t love honey?”

Hooijschuur had to learn a great deal of information before beekeeping, which he didn’t mind doing at all; gaining so much knowledge reinforced his love and admiration for bees. He cares for his bees by giving them consistent attention and wants them to have the best life possible while producing a healthy amount of honey.

“I would argue that the quality of the honey isn’t determined by what flower the bees are exposed to, but it depends on how well its stored and if the bees are healthy because if the bees are healthy it will be properly dehydrated and it won’t have that many contaminants,” Hooijschuur said.

Hooijschuur has become closer with his bees by naming his two queens interesting things such as, “Bee-antoinette,” and “Scotty-Bee,” because he thinks of his bees like family. Not only have the bees become his family, but he also plans on joining some beekeeping organizations around around Rockingham county and/or Guilford county. He believes that the beekeeping community will be a nice way to meet some other passionate people and get some help if he needs it.

“A responsible thing to do is to go out there and find other beekeepers if you need help, or if you need equipment, or if you need more bees you could just get it from them which is another awesome thing about beekeeping,” Hooijschuur said.

He really enjoys beekeeping so far and is glad he’s been able to experience first-hand the wonderful things bees have to offer.

“I just really wanted to go out there and do something on my own and take the initiative,” Hooijschuur said. “I wanted to find a unique way to differentiate myself from anyone else while also using my time in a constructive manner, and I think that beekeeping is a relatively easy way to go.”

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Northwest’s newest beekeeper buzzes his way through the halls