Northwest Horizons

Theatre students to perform “Rutherford Wolf”

A+fourth+period+technical+theatre+student+sews+leaves+onto+a+green+shirt.+This+will+be+worn+by+a+tree+actor+on+the+performance+nights.+
A fourth period technical theatre student sews leaves onto a green shirt. This will be worn by a tree actor on the performance nights.

A fourth period technical theatre student sews leaves onto a green shirt. This will be worn by a tree actor on the performance nights.

A fourth period technical theatre student sews leaves onto a green shirt. This will be worn by a tree actor on the performance nights.

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So far this school year, the Northwest high school Make Believers have taken on endeavors such as writing and performing their own one-act play as well as creating a school-wide haunted house. Now, they have taken on a new project: a children’s play.

Entitled “Rutherford Wolf”, the play revolves around the title character, Rutherford Wolf, as well as other characters such as Little Red Riding Hood and the three little pigs, who may be more familiar to some. Though some may think the characters might make the story seem like it is solely for small children, others argue that its major theme has a meaning that is accessible to all ages.

“I believe the overall message of Rutherford Wolf is to not judge a book by its cover,” senior and director of the play Riley Oates said.

An archetypal character seen in several children’s stories is the big, bad wolf, but Rutherford Wolf tries to break away from labels that have been bestowed upon him. In the play, Rutherford is a vegetarian who aspires to move to the big city away from all of the “dog-eat-dog, survival of the fittest nonsense.”

The play follows his journey and attempts to move out of the forest, all the while running into people that assume because he is a wolf he is bad news.

Other than a message that percolates with audiences young and old, many stylistic choices deviating from the script have been made, such as the choice of having trees portrayed by actors.

“It might take [the kids watching] a second to understand the technical aspects of the trees,” junior and tree Henry Godino said. “But they help the story move along, and if it works out well, everything should be smooth.”

Other adaptations to the script have been the addition of some props and the doubling up of characters.

“It’s really a once in a lifetime experience to watch the show and my visions unfold on a stage,” Oates said.

The theatre students will be putting on the show on Feb. 16 and Feb. 17 for all to be able to watch the show.

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Theatre students to perform “Rutherford Wolf”