Science Olympiad prepares for competition

The+2016+Science+Olympiad+team+poses+for+a+picture+with+their+medals+after+the+regional+competition.+Many+students+have+enjoyed+participating+in+the+wide+variety+of+events+Science+Olympiad+offers.
Back to Article
Back to Article

Science Olympiad prepares for competition

The 2016 Science Olympiad team poses for a picture with their medals after the regional competition. Many students have enjoyed participating in the wide variety of events Science Olympiad offers.

The 2016 Science Olympiad team poses for a picture with their medals after the regional competition. Many students have enjoyed participating in the wide variety of events Science Olympiad offers.

The 2016 Science Olympiad team poses for a picture with their medals after the regional competition. Many students have enjoyed participating in the wide variety of events Science Olympiad offers.

The 2016 Science Olympiad team poses for a picture with their medals after the regional competition. Many students have enjoyed participating in the wide variety of events Science Olympiad offers.

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






Preparation, commitment, coaching and practice are a few things that go into Science Olympiad. It consists of 23 team events that range from biology to chemistry to ecology to physics to computer science and more. Active, hands-on group participation allows for students to partake in a specialized area of science that they would like to learn more about.

Northwest Science Olympiad has been around for more than 17 years, started by physics teacher Rice Strange in 1999-2000.

“When I moved to Greensboro from Raleigh, I noticed that Northwest did not have a Science Olympiad team,” Strange said. “I had already been coaching Science Olympiad for 10 years in Wake County, and it was project I wanted to undertake.”

Science Olympiad allows students interested in science to participate in the level they are most comfortable with as well. Students may choose to be on the varsity team if they are willing to put in more time into the competition, or they may choose to be on the junior varsity team if they know they will be too busy to put in a lot of time into preparation.

The team with the lowest number of points wins the competition. These points come from each individual event which is why it is so crucial for teamwork and commitment.

“At competition, each event consists of either a written test, a lab/building component or some combination of the two, senior Mariusz Derezinski-Choo said. “Each team member competes in a few of the 23 events, and collectively the results from those events determine our school’s placing.”

Many students join Science Olympiad because of their love of science and the desire to explore it further.

“I like how there is so much variety in what you can do,” Derezinski-Choo said. “Every event teaches you something that you wouldn’t see in a conventional high school science class.”

This year will be Derezinski-Choo’s third year participating in Science Olympiad and his second year on the executive committee. He will be competing in Optics, Code Busters (a test on encryption/ciphers), Thermodynamics and Mousetrap Vehicles. Derezinski-Choo and his partner have been preparing for the competition coming up in Feb. 17.

“My partner and I have been studying and taking practice tests on the material we will be tested on,” Derezinski-Choo said. “I built a stimulation of the lab we have to do for Optics, and we’ve been doing trial runs to make sure our execution is seamless on competition day. We are also currently in the process of designing and building the devices we need to be prepared for Thermodynamics and Mousetrap Vehicle.”

For sophomore Amy Kim, it wasn’t her decision to initially join Science Olympiad.

“At first, I joined under the influence of my sister, but I have really grown to like how we get to interact with people and learn new things as we go,” Kim said.

This year is Kim’s second year competing. She is participating in Dynamic Planet, Ecology and Write it/Do it.

“To prepare, my partners and I are going to read over the rules and start practicing like we’re in the real competition,” Kim said. “For example, for Write it/Do it, we will practice writing and make sure we can clearly understand each other so we can build the object perfectly.”

Science Olympiad will give you the opportunity to try something new or explore your passion for science even further.

“I like watching kids discover how much they love the science that maybe they only liked before,” Strange said.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email