Northwest Horizons School News

Northwest Horizons

“No thanks”giving: Why Thanksgiving is not an adequate holiday

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Every year in America, we set aside the fourth Thursday of November to celebrate a holiday dating back to the times of Plymouth Rock. A time when we were friendlier, a time when Europeans and Native Americans alike came together to celebrate a great harvest season and their fortunate lives.

However, this is a gleaming misconception. The first Thanksgiving celebrated was not like how it has been portrayed to students of all ages time and time again. The first Thanksgiving was in 1620, yes. The Native Americans helped the European settlers survive through their first year in the New World, yes. But, for the most part, everything else we have been taught holds some degree of a lie.

Squanto, the Native American famous for being able to speak English and for showing the settlers how to plant corn, was a slave of the British. The gigantic feast that was said to have been harvested in 1620 didn’t contain a turkey, and, by today’s standards, was more of a light meal than a feast.

Despite the untruthful background that has been given about the first Thanksgiving in America, the way it is celebrated today also stirs some issues in Northwest’s student body.

“There is no point [to Thanksgiving],” senior Alicia Dimatteo said. “You can eat a lot of food every day with your family. I hate [Thanksgiving]. There’s not even any Thanksgiving songs–there’s just a turkey.”

Going along with food, many children in America, 1 in 13, to be exact, have food allergies that may prohibit them from being able to eat all of their family’s favorite traditional foods. Furthermore, in the United States, there are 7.3 million people who are vegetarian, 1 million of which are vegan.

“People can get really nervous about Thanksgiving,” junior Thomas Altmann said. “If they are vegan or have an allergy they might [have to] refuse food.”

All in all, Thanksgiving is not “Foodsgiving,” it should not be all about the food. It should be about coming together and being thankful for what we have–right?

“People use one day to be thankful for everything [we have],” senior Taylor Johnson said. “[I think] we should be thankful all the time.”

Why do we have to take one day out of the year to be appreciative? No matter how much we have or are given in this life, we should take a little time every day to be grateful for it.

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1 Comment

One Response to ““No thanks”giving: Why Thanksgiving is not an adequate holiday”

  1. Cosette Daymore on November 28th, 2017 10:58 pm

    Very very unnecessarily harsh on my favorite holiday. Theese insults are just plain rude and don’t make any sense

    “Going along with food, many children in America, 1 in 13, to be exact, have food allergies that may prohibit them from being able to eat all of their family’s favorite traditional foods. Furthermore, in the United States, there are 7.3 million people who are vegetarian, 1 million of which are vegan.”

    -Like literally vegans/allergic people can just eat something different. Nobody is saying you have to eat a turkey. Y’all seem to think that a Holiday must be celebrated in one fixed way and by everyone. 1 in 10 Americans don’t celebrate Christmas. They might feel uncomfortable when they see a Christmas tree in your parlor, so I guess we can’t have that either.

    “Why do we have to take one day out of the year to be appreciative? No matter how much we have or are given in this life, we should take a little time every day to be grateful for it.”

    -For like the same reason every other holiday exists: to remind us and to have one day extra devoted to that cause. Having one day devoted to being thankful doesn’t mean we aren’t thankful the rest of the year. In fact, I believe thanksgiving allows us to refresh our feelings of gratitude each year. Without it, people would pause to be thankful less often. Its the same reason we have things like Christmas and Independence Day. This article’s train of thought could be extended to conclude things like “Why celebrate 4th of July? we should be patriotic every day” “Why have Christmas? we should celebrate god every day”

    tldr: people need to understand why holidays exist before making sweeping generalizations

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Northwest Horizons School News
“No thanks”giving: Why Thanksgiving is not an adequate holiday