Northwest Horizons School News

Northwest Horizons

Friends get together to give: Friendsgiving

A+turkey+sits+on+a+dinner+table.+Classic+dishes+such+as+turkey+and+gravy+are+brought+to+%22Friendsgiving%22+gatherings.
A turkey sits on a dinner table. Classic dishes such as turkey and gravy are brought to

A turkey sits on a dinner table. Classic dishes such as turkey and gravy are brought to "Friendsgiving" gatherings.

A turkey sits on a dinner table. Classic dishes such as turkey and gravy are brought to "Friendsgiving" gatherings.

Advertisement

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






“Friendsgiving.” No, not “Thanksgiving.” Friendsgiving.

This term was coined during the late 2000s when millennials began searching for jobs in big cities and could not afford to fly home for Thanksgiving. As a result, the gathering of friends during this time of the year became so popular that it was given a title.

“[The trend] has been getting bigger for the last couple of years,” Latin teacher Parker Jackson said. “A lot of T.V. shows started to pick it up so people have started to adopt it as a thing that they do with their friends.”

The “holiday” typically falls during the week leading up to Thanksgiving and in the days right before that Thursday. The premise of the gathering is relatively simple. Participants assign and make through a coordinated effort a range of dishes that are brought to one location and feasted on as a potluck. All the typical Thanksgiving treats are expected to be at the gathering. Dishes include the ever so important turkey, gravy, potatoes, stuffing, cranberry sauce, and of course, desserts.

There are a lot of reasons that students at Northwest celebrate “Friendsgiving.”

“You celebrate Thanksgiving as friends because you won’t be together on Thanksgiving since you’ll be with your family,” junior Mackenzie Bickar said. “It’s really fun because you don’t have any stress about school.”

Indeed the “holiday” provides students a way to relax after a taxing first semester in school.

“I think high schoolers have decided that it’s a good way to hang out and spend time together over break,” Jackson said. “This is when they have time to spend.”

Even though “Friendsgiving” may have been a new trend a few years ago, it seems like the popularity of the holiday has made it a trend that might outlast itself and become a tradition.

“I think it’ll last because it seems that the culture is shifting to where we make our own family,” Jackson said. “People who don’t get to be with their family [during Thanksgiving] find their [other] family in their friends.”

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Leave a Comment

Discuss the story here; your name and email are not required. All comments will be strictly moderated.




Northwest Horizons School News
Friends get together to give: Friendsgiving