Northwest Horizons School News

Northwest Horizons

Thirst Project brings Water Crisis to Northwest

Northwest+students+sign+a+Jerrycan+on+the+morning+of+Oct.+25+2017.+The+Thirst+Project+presents+information+and+sets+goals+regarding+the+Water+Crisis+to+teens+and+young+adults+all+over+the+country.
Northwest students sign a Jerrycan on the morning of Oct. 25 2017. The Thirst Project presents information and sets goals regarding the Water Crisis to teens and young adults all over the country.

Northwest students sign a Jerrycan on the morning of Oct. 25 2017. The Thirst Project presents information and sets goals regarding the Water Crisis to teens and young adults all over the country.

Northwest students sign a Jerrycan on the morning of Oct. 25 2017. The Thirst Project presents information and sets goals regarding the Water Crisis to teens and young adults all over the country.

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“All change begins with the belief that change is possible.” Throughout history, we’ve seen this ideology, among many of similar premises, shape the world we live in. Founded in 2007 by an “average” group of college students in Los Angeles, the Thirst Project works to fulfill the promise that change will come if we as a population, primarily young people, set our minds to providing clean water for impoverished nations.

On Oct. 25, 2017, the Thirst Project came to Northwest as a response to a series of emails by Key Club.

“[Junior] Angela Seo went to the Key Club International Convention this summer where the Thirst Project was presented,” social studies teacher and Key Club advisor Elizabeth Russell said. “She actually contacted me in July after contacting them and asked for an assembly date so it was her enthusiasm that caused this.”

Through an hour-long presentation, two young adults from the Thirst Project reported various statistics, shared their experiences, and spoke of how pragmatic the Water Crisis is in today’s world.

The Water Crisis kills more people in the world than anything else. This includes malaria, war, AIDS, and many other causes that we often turn to when looking for something to blame for high child mortality and death rates. This crisis is one we see all over the globe. It’s estimated that 663 million people do not have access to clean water. Between sub-Saharan Africa, developing southern and eastern Asian countries, and even our very own Flint, Michigan, the problem almost seems too big to tackle.

However, The Thirst Project claims and proves that it is more than possible to provide clean, safe drinking water sources all over the world. In the past nine years, the project has raised $8.8 million, traveled to 13 countries, worked on over 2,000 projects, and served over 33,000 people.

“It’s a terrific idea for [the Thirst Project] to connect with high school and college students because they have a tremendous amount of energy and enthusiasm and idealism and they have a specific goal: 2022—clean water for everyone in Swaziland. That’s the kind of goal that can energize people,” Russell said.

About 50 students showed up to the presentation at Northwest, but many proved Russell’s statement to be true.

“At the end, I saw a number of folks that were excited to talk to the two guys that presented so I was really happy about the response. I didn’t hear many leaving saying, “that was boring” or “I don’t know about this,” most people were like “hey, what can I do?” and that’s exciting,” Russell said.

One of the students that decided to take action into her own hands was junior Rylee Petty who decided, upon watching the presentation to start her own GoFundMe page raising money for the people through the Thirst Project.

“The Thirst Project presentation helped me realize that you can start no matter what age you are. Being in high school, I didn’t feel like I could have a large impact but the Thirst Project showed me that you can impact and help change the lives of those who need it,” Petty said.

As presented, it only takes $25 to provide safe drinking water to an individual for life. Petty’s goal, however, is to raise $500. Since the presentation last week, she has already raised over 10% of what she hopes to achieve.

“It would be impactful for people start researching and taking action to help those who don’t have access to something we overlook every day. Even though we are all young, it doesn’t mean we can’t make a change.”

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Northwest Horizons School News
Thirst Project brings Water Crisis to Northwest