Northwest Horizons School News

Northwest Horizons

Update: Guilford County’s 10-point grading scale in action

The+Guilford+County+Student+Handbook+depicts+the+new+grading+scale+on+page+67.+This+reference+helps+clarify+the+scale+for+new+students.
The Guilford County Student Handbook depicts the new grading scale on page 67. This reference helps clarify the scale for new students.

The Guilford County Student Handbook depicts the new grading scale on page 67. This reference helps clarify the scale for new students.

The Guilford County Student Handbook depicts the new grading scale on page 67. This reference helps clarify the scale for new students.

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This is an update of an article from 2015.

The school year of 2015 -2016 brought a grading scale change to Northwest High School, as well as schools across North Carolina.

Having previously operated on seven-point grading scale, Northwest saw a major change in the academic lives of students with the 10-point grading scale.

“Now it’s easier to get grades that some people really don’t deserve,” junior Rylee Petty said. “You can make lower grades and still make an A or a B.”

Having been a sophomore the year the grading scale was changed, Petty still had the experience of a seven-point grading scale her freshman year.

While younger high school students may not have had this experience, they still find themselves making a comparison between their middle school seven- point grading scale and their current 10-point scale.

“Because of the seven-point grading scale [in middle school], if you had a lower grade, you would feel more discouraged even though [the grade] might be an A in high school,” sophomore Amber Small said.

When the grading scale was first announced, many students questioned if teachers would change the way they graded. It seems that the results have seen both changed and unchanged grading methods.

“It depends on the teacher’s opinion on how they grade things,” Small said. “They are making sure that students have a good hold on the subject.”

Having been implemented for three years now, the grading scale gets both positive and negative feedback from students.

“I like the 10-point grading scale better because it looks better when you get a B instead of a C,” freshman Dexter Ande said.

Not all students agree. Some students feel that the larger scale has had negative impacts.

“Students may not work as hard to get an A,” sophomore Kyndall Cherry said. “All [students] have to do is get to a 90 or an 89.5.”

Despite the opinions of some, it appears that North Carolina’s 10-point grading scale is here to stay.

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Northwest Horizons School News
Update: Guilford County’s 10-point grading scale in action