Northwest junior reveals rare health disorder

Northwest+junior+Colby+Proctor+has+Primary+Ciliary+Dyskinesia.+Less+than+500%2C000+people+in+the+world+have+been+diagnosed+with+this+disorder.
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Northwest junior reveals rare health disorder

Northwest junior Colby Proctor has Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia. Less than 500,000 people in the world have been diagnosed with this disorder.

Northwest junior Colby Proctor has Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia. Less than 500,000 people in the world have been diagnosed with this disorder.

Northwest junior Colby Proctor has Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia. Less than 500,000 people in the world have been diagnosed with this disorder.

Northwest junior Colby Proctor has Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia. Less than 500,000 people in the world have been diagnosed with this disorder.

Montana Murphy, sports editor

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One of 25,000 Americans and one of only 400,000 people diagnosed worldwide, and he walks through the halls of school just like every other student. Northwest Junior Colby Proctor is part of a small group of people to have been diagnosed with the disorder Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia, also known as PCD.

PCD occurs when the cilia in one’s nose, lungs and airways don’t properly function and fail to move mucus out of the respiratory system. Without mucus being removed from such areas, buildup makes these cilia-lacking regions susceptible to many infections. This cycle continues and worsens and causes those diagnosed to experience reoccurring cases of infections and illnesses, which are challenging to fight.

“It’s harder for me to get over sicknesses, and it makes it easier for me to get things like that,” said Proctor. “I’ve got over a hundred documented sinus infections, just [diagnosed] from going to the doctors.”

From a young age, Proctor realized something wasn’t right, as he experienced unusual everyday symptoms. Proctor sought medical care for a diagnosis.

“All the time, every day when I was really little, I’d have sinus infections,” said Proctor. “I just always had headaches every day, just headache, headache, headache. I finally went to Brenar’s Childrens Hospital and they figured it out.”

While the disorder is not currently curable, they are measures that can be taken to lessen the severity of symptoms. Patients can undergo surgeries and take medications to alleviate symptoms and side effects. Proctor himself has had surgery to clear his sinuses and occasionally takes antibiotics to aid his recovery with some ailments.

“I had to get a surgery where they cleared out my sinuses and all kinds of things like that. I’ve had to have antibiotics to assist me in getting over stuff,” said Proctor.

The cause or root of the disorder is unknown, though there are some speculations as cilia movement contributes to the development of organs in fetuses.

“They think it’s genetic,” said Proctor.

Proctor sees an ear, nose and throat doctor who helps him monitor the problem and any associated issues that come along with it.

While the disorder can at times become overbearing, especially when it hasn’t yet been diagnosed or treated, it can be came to terms with and eventually just seen as another aspect to everyday life.

“To start, when I didn’t know about it, it was really bad,” said Proctor. “It was an everyday headache and I felt miserable. After I found out what it was, I’m kind of just living a normal life now. No headaches all the time, just one every now and again. [PCD] is simple, but it’s different.”

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