Northwest deciphers old sport slang

Sophomore+Jadyn+Murray+will+punch+you+in+the+%27beezer%27%21+Her+and+others+at+Northwest+tried+to+guess+what+that+word+means.
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Northwest deciphers old sport slang

Sophomore Jadyn Murray will punch you in the 'beezer'! Her and others at Northwest tried to guess what that word means.

Sophomore Jadyn Murray will punch you in the 'beezer'! Her and others at Northwest tried to guess what that word means.

Sophomore Jadyn Murray will punch you in the 'beezer'! Her and others at Northwest tried to guess what that word means.

Sophomore Jadyn Murray will punch you in the 'beezer'! Her and others at Northwest tried to guess what that word means.

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There are some crazy ways to express what happened in “last night’s game.” Sports slang has even weirder origins that one would never guess.

Northwest students including sophomore Lucas Carmanelli, freshman Jadyn Murray and junior Spencer Wommack tried to guess what some sports slang terms mean along, with English teacher Sarah Hutchinson.

“Hang Time”

This term, often used in basketball, represents the amount of time a player can stay in the air after jumping. Carmanelli and Hutchinson got this one correct, Wommack said something that could also work with football.

“How long a football stays in the air during a punt?” Wommack said.

Murray guessed something a little different.

“How long you can last on a wave while surfing, like ‘hang 10,'” Murray suggested.

“Drop the Gloves!”

This phrase is used in ice hockey when players take off their gloves to fist fight. No one could guess this one.

“To lower your punch in boxing?” Hutchinson incorrectly guessed.

“Hit the Links”

This phrase means ‘to go golfing.’ This is because golf courses are in areas known as the ‘links.’ They are the ‘link’ between shore and farm land; unable to grow crops in their dry terrain, they make great golf courses. Hutchinson was able to guess it, while others thought differently.

“Telling a baseball player to hit a home run, like over the fence,” Murray said.

“Hit in the Beezer”

Beezer is another word for nose in boxing, when someone gets hit.

“It’s a football?” Carmanelli guessed.

Wommack had a less specific answer.

“Another word for a win?” Wommack suggested.

“Blitz”

In football, a defensive attack where players who usually cover runners attack the passer is called a ‘blitz.’ It was derived from the word, ‘blitzkrieg,’ a war tactic in World War II with attacking force all at one time against the enemy. Donald Ettinger used this defense through 1948 and 1950 on the New York Giants, and William Arnsparger also used it on the Miami Dolphins.

Wommack was able to guess, while others came close.

“Approaching the opposite team before the ball is given back to the quarterback,” Murray said.

“The Ducks Are on the Pond”

This baseball phrase means that there are players in the outfield or that the bases are loaded. Arch McDonald, announcer for the Washington Senators, was the first to say it. It was widely used throughout the 20th century, and sometimes today.

Everyone was able to guess this phrase.

“Strike 3! Grab some pine, meat!”

Mike Krukow would often use this phrase as an announcer for the Giants MLB team. It was originally meant to reference the pine tar on baseball bats which was used for a better grip.

Today it is often used as another way to tell someone to sit on the bench. Wommack guessed the original meaning, while others at least got the sport correct.

‘He is off the schneid’

This is another way to say that a player has broken a scoreless streak with a score. ‘Schneid’ comes from the German word, ‘schneider,’ which is someone who cuts cloth like players cut their bad streaks. Wommack was able to guess this one, too.

 

Why don’t we use these phrases ubiquitously anymore? They give comedic relief in stressful games and are just fun to say.

Hutchinson gave an etymological explanation.

“Language changes throughout generations because the younger generation wants a sense of ownership with their own slang,” she said. “It’ s a natural transition, especially when the old sayings are no longer politically correct.”

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