Northwest begins hosting tryouts for spring sports

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Northwest begins hosting tryouts for spring sports

The calm before the storm as the Northwest tennis courts remain empty before boys' tennis tryouts later in the afternoon. Tryouts for spring sports typically start mid-February.

The calm before the storm as the Northwest tennis courts remain empty before boys' tennis tryouts later in the afternoon. Tryouts for spring sports typically start mid-February.

The calm before the storm as the Northwest tennis courts remain empty before boys' tennis tryouts later in the afternoon. Tryouts for spring sports typically start mid-February.

The calm before the storm as the Northwest tennis courts remain empty before boys' tennis tryouts later in the afternoon. Tryouts for spring sports typically start mid-February.

Montana Murphy, staff writer

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Every year, towards the end of February, hundreds of Northwest students find themselves on a field, track, court or course, anxiously anticipating the beginning. It’s time for spring sports.

For months now, athletes and coaches involved in softball, baseball, track and field, boys’ tennis, girls’ lacrosse, boys’ golf and boys’ lacrosse have been preparing for the start of their spring seasons.

“To prepare for the season I go to the baseball cages and I throw with my dad,” sophomore Thomas Smith said.

Smith plans on trying out for baseball. Like Smith, many athletes take special measures in order to prepare themselves for tryouts. Freshman Savannah Ronsun, who prepares herself like others, plans on trying out for girls’ lacrosse.

“To get ready for the season, I practice and I look up videos online about things I don’t know,” Ronsun said.

Players aren’t the only ones that make an effort to be prepared for tryouts. Coaches put a lot of time into getting ready and planning for tryouts.

“We had to take some courses to prepare, especially for concussion and fundamentals,” junior varsity softball coach Summer Dillon said. “We’ve met as coaches a lot to talk about what we’re going to do for tryouts and the upcoming season.”

Coaches must plan what they will do during tryouts and they also get together to discuss plans for how they want the season to go.

“I have to plan everything out, what we’re going to do that day, who’s going to cover what,” varsity boys’ lacrosse coach Mark Goldsmith said.

Often times, coaches and players arrange preseason workouts to get the team working together and getting in shape before the season starts.

“We do a lot of conditioning, hitting and fielding so we can see what they need to work out or what their skills are,” Dillon said.

Preseason workouts can involve conditioning, weightlifting, skill work and scrimmaging. Teams want to get as much preparation in as possible to better themselves for the upcoming season.

“For the first time, the women’s soccer team got to use the weight room for preseason conditioning,” senior Rachel Kizito said.

Having workouts before the season allow coaches to get a good idea of what they are going to be seeing at tryouts.

“You have a pretty good idea of who is going to be attending tryouts because they wouldn’t be coming to our preseason conditioning if they didn’t plan on coming out,” Goldsmith said.

Going into tryouts, coaches often have a good idea of what they will be watching for in their athletes.

“We look for if they have the skills, if they are well conditioned, if their mental skills are strong and if they know of all the plays and the rules,” Dillon said.

Coaches tend to seek well-rounded players that not only have the athletic skills, but also have a hard-working mentality. Coaches want players that physically meet the part but can also be coached and trained.

“At tryouts I look for athleticism, skill level and work ethic,” Goldsmith said.

Tryouts can be a nerve-wracking experience for athletes, but often times, returning players have a good idea of what to expect.

“I’m not nervous for tryouts because I’ve done it before,” Smith said.

By the time tryouts come around, players have sometimes had the chance to get a feel for what the coach and team will be like.

“I’m not nervous for tryouts because by now I know the system and I’ve gotten to know the coach,” Kizito said.

Other younger players who have never had the experience of trying out for a high school level team may accumulate a higher level of nervousness for tryouts.

“I’ve never tried out for another sport so I don’t know what to expect,” Ronsun said. “I just hope I do great.”

All spring sports tryouts, other than boys’ golf, were originally planned to have started after school on February 15 and end on February 17. However, due to inclement weather, they have been rescheduled to begin February 16.

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