Northwest Horizons

Classroom atmospheres after AP exams

Sophomores+Joey+Sawyer+and+Harrison+Hill+work+on+a+project+assigned+by+math+teacher+Catherine+Brown+after+the+AP+statistics+exam.+
Sophomores Joey Sawyer and Harrison Hill work on a project assigned by math teacher Catherine Brown after the AP statistics exam.

Sophomores Joey Sawyer and Harrison Hill work on a project assigned by math teacher Catherine Brown after the AP statistics exam.

Sophomores Joey Sawyer and Harrison Hill work on a project assigned by math teacher Catherine Brown after the AP statistics exam.

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By Shalini Sharma and Alexis Rutledge on May 27th, 2015:

As the clock ticks, the room is silent. Students have been preparing all year for this moment: taking the test that will give them college credit for the Advanced Placement course they have been working so hard in. The administrator says the testing period is over, and all the students close their testing booklets. Breathe, it’s over….Now what?

Each AP teacher has their own plan for what to do after the exams are over. Some have chosen to continue to teach as they were before. For example, AP English teacher Sherilyn Little plans to read more books and work with poetry for the remainder of the year.

“I choose to do this because there are always things to learn and we are still in school,” Little said.

Some students agree with their teachers’ decisions to assign work—even if it is not related to the course—after AP exams because they feel like their class time is being used efficiently.

Sophomores Joey Sawyer and Harrison Hill work on a project assigned by math teacher Catherine Brown after the AP statistics exam.

Sophomores Joey Sawyer and Harrison Hill work on a project assigned by math teacher Catherine Brown after the AP statistics exam.

“Personally I think that it’s really stupid we have to come back [to AP classes] and do nothing to get counted as present,” senior Megan Critchley said. “I think [teachers] should either prepare us for stuff we are going to do in college, such as continuing to teach the [AP] material, or let people stay at home.”

While Little continues to teach as normal, other teachers choose to relax, letting the students focus on their other courses until the end of the year. AP earth and environmental science teacher Richard Thomas has arranged for his students to work on projects, solar ovens, a nature scavenger hunt, chalk drawings and some uncompleted labs.

“[I want to give my students a break] because the AP exam is over. It’s time to have some fun,” Thomas said.

Some students, like some of the teachers, believe that after AP exams, students should have the opportunity to rest after spending many days, and sometimes weeks, preparing for their exams.

“I think that teachers should let [students] relax, because if there’s nothing else they need to teach, then there’s nothing else we need to learn,” sophomore Kinley Brown said. “Also, if we get to [relax by] watching movies in a class, it could give others an opportunity to study for other exams.”

Along with these students, some honors teachers have opinions about what the AP teachers should be doing with their students. For instance, chemistry teacher Cynthia Mardis feels that AP teachers should lessen the load of work, just as she did during the AP exams, so that students can focus on studying for the upcoming finals.

“I understand that teachers want to keep the students busy with projects but it should be to the length and detail that it only needs to be done in class,” Mardis said.

 

 

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Classroom atmospheres after AP exams