Freshmen PSAT Day

"It's strange that one class could ruin everything."

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Freshmen PSAT Day

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On Wed, Oct 10, sophomores and juniors took the PSAT, a nationwide test to help practice for the SAT. Seniors, being in the preparing stages for the SAT (or having already taken it), got to skip school. Freshmen, however, were required to take the PACT, a test that, for them, holds no merit. They only had to take the inconsequential test because the current junior class of Northwest messed up their chances of having a free day when they were freshmen themselves. The test that Freshman have to take every Oct has no value, which means there’s no reason for freshmen to need to take the test.

“I think it’s an important way to estimate how your score would be on the actual ACT so that you have ample time to repair,” sophomore Sawyer Rhoney said. “But it’s definitely not fair that everyone else has to suffer because of on grade level.”

Sophomores and freshmen might not know that, instead of taking the PACT, freshmen were taken to a grade-wide assembly. In the past, speakers like Whitney Thore, North Carolina star of My Big Fat Fabulous Life, have come to the school on PSAT day and spoken to the freshmen class. The last time this happened was when the current class of 2020 were in ninth grade themselves. According to various teachers, freshmen now take the PACT instead of having an assembly because of the way the current juniors behaved. They were called disruptive, disrespectful, and loud.

School administration has declined a comment on the subject matter.

Many students believe the newfound testing establishment is unfair, saying that the behavior of one class shouldn’t dictate how the rest of the generation is treated.

“We shouldn’t have to suffer for other people’s mistakes,” sophomore Evan Edwards said.

Edwards took the PACT as a freshman last year and believes the test is unnecessary.

“It’s kind of strange that one class could ruin everything for everyone else,” freshman Jet Hampton said.

“If you think about it, this is kind of like when senior quotes were banned from the yearbook just because that one senior got away with saying something dirty,” Edwards said. “I’m probably not going to have a senior quote in my last yearbook because of one person, and it’s completely unfair.”

Most everyone is familiar with the concept of a punishment being given to a group when only a small portion of the group is causing trouble. A student in the back of a classroom could be goofing off and a teacher might give the entire class busy work; a sibling may break a vase and all the rest of the siblings may have to help clean it up. No matter how many times it happens, though, it can still seem unfair towards those who consider themselves innocent.

“I don’t think taking (the PACT) is helpful for me,” Hamton said. “We were operating on the same time schedule as the PSAT, so we weren’t given the right amount of time for each section. (Last Wednesday) was definitely not intended for the PACT.”

While some students don’t have high hopes for change, there are a few who are willing to take a stand.

“Maybe if we can all rally together we can get this to change,” Edwards said.

“If we get enough students together, we could maybe get it to change,” Hampton said. “There’s just not enough momentum to keep that going if people actually went to do that“

“We can get less tests or we can get more tests,” Edwards said. “But, hey, the Greensboro Sit-Ins had to start somewhere, right?”

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