UNCG honor band: Northwest students perform in the 30th annual Carolina Band Festival

The+9-10+Concert+Honor+Band+prepares+to+share+their+pieces+in+concert+for+the+first+time+on+February+16
Back to Article
Back to Article

UNCG honor band: Northwest students perform in the 30th annual Carolina Band Festival

The 9-10 Concert Honor Band prepares to share their pieces in concert for the first time on February 16

The 9-10 Concert Honor Band prepares to share their pieces in concert for the first time on February 16

The 9-10 Concert Honor Band prepares to share their pieces in concert for the first time on February 16

The 9-10 Concert Honor Band prepares to share their pieces in concert for the first time on February 16

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






Last weekend, 11 Northwest students were selected to perform in UNCG’s 30th annual Carolina Band Festival as a part of their honor band program. Overall, those students in attendance devoted around 20 hours to the festival over the course of three days.

Each student had to submit an audition tape demonstrating their musical abilities and skills to UNCG prior to being accepted. The honor bands accepted auditions from across six states in the southeastern United States, accepting students from as far as Tampa, Florida to participate.

“After about three months or so of practicing my piece, I did the video audition of myself playing a solo that was about three minutes long,” freshman and seventh chair french horn player Logan Monday said. “I was worried for a while whether I would make it because there were a lot of people auditioning, but in the end, I got the acceptance email, and I was so relieved and happy about it.”

From there, under the instruction of Dr. Catherine Rand and Col. Michael Colburn, the accepted students had three rehearsals to prepare for one big concert on Saturday, February 16.

“The rehearsals were so productive because we had to learn five pieces in just the one day,” sophomore and fourth chair clarinetist Madeline Mai said. “We would run through sections of a piece and fix little things until we could play it accurately and musically. Working little sections made the full piece sound really smooth and effortless.”

Print Friendly, PDF & Email