Almost 50 years later, Selma is now

Almost 50 years later, Selma is now

By Satoria Ray on January 27th, 2015:   

unnamed  Selma, directed by Ava DuVernay, focuses on the 1965 march led by King from Selma, Alabama to the state capitol in Montgomery. The movie opens with King accepting his Nobel Peace Prize followed by the horrifying bombing of the 16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, which killed four young black girls. Throughout the movie viewers see heated interaction between King and President Lyndon B. Johnson, tension between King and his wife and all the planning it took to make the march happen.

Selma performed relatively low in box office sales, only bringing in $11.2 million during opening weekend. Despite the sales, Selma is a must-see movie, especially for young people. The film uses a combination of suspense and sharp acting to depict the struggles that blacks faced trying to vote in the recently intergraded South. It shows the deaths, the beatings and the verbal abuse they faced all to cast a ballot.

This film is important for young people. So important that a fund in New York City was created to allow seventh, eighth and ninth graders to see the movie for free during Martin Luther King weekend. The young generation is often criticized for their voter apathy. This movie will make young viewers, of all races, wonder why they ever took the right to vote for granted. It will enrage viewers, it will inspire viewers and it will make viewers want to be the first in line at voting centers.